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International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes: Building and Sustaining Capacity (Strategies for Education and Training, Networking and Knowledge Management) IAEA CN-215

Europe/Vienna
Board Room C (IAEA, Vienna)

Board Room C

IAEA, Vienna

Description
Participants in the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) first major conference in this area, the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes that was held in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, from 14 to 18 March 2010, placed a high value on information exchange and recommended that similar conferences be organized every four to five years. Furthermore, participants also:
  • Highlighted the need to broaden nuclear engineering and technology curricula to include ‘soft’ sciences, such as risk analysis, law, and social sciences;
  • Recognized that successful nuclear power programmes can succeed only with strong governmental and societal support; and
  • Requested more cooperation — locally, nationally and internationally — in building human resources for a nuclear power programme, overcoming isolationist trends.
Consequently, the IAEA is organizing the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes: Building and Sustaining Capacity (Strategies for Education and Training, Networking and Knowledge Management) in Vienna, Austria, from 12 to 16 May 2014.
Capacity building is a major first step in the process of ensuring a sustainable supply of suitably qualified human resources that are ready to assume their responsibility for safe, responsible and sustainable use of nuclear technologies. Capacity building in the IAEA is defined as consisting of four essential elements: human resource development (HRD); education and training; knowledge management; and knowledge networks at the national, regional and international level. The IAEA’s capacity building programmes cover all the nuclear safety areas — including safe operation, emergency preparedness and response, and regulatory effectiveness — and seek to build upon existing capacity building infrastructures. The importance of capacity building was underlined in the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (2011), where one of the actions calls upon Member States with nuclear power programmes, as well as those planning to embark on such a programme, to strengthen, develop, maintain and implement their capacity building programmes. Also, the critical role of human resources and capacity building in developing and maintaining nuclear infrastructure was reiterated by subsequent international experts’ meetings related to this topic.
This conference will focus on the global challenges of capacity building, HRD, education and training, nuclear knowledge management and the establishment of knowledge networks, including the themes reflected in the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety.
    • 9:00 AM 12:00 PM
      Registration Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

    • 12:00 PM 2:00 PM
      Lunch 2h
    • 2:00 PM 3:30 PM
      Opening Plenary Session Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Convener: Mr Pal Kovacs
      • 2:00 PM
        DDG Opening Remarks 10m
      • 2:10 PM
        IAEA Capacity Building Strategy ( includes outcomes of the 2010 conference) 20m
        Speakers: Mr Brian Molloy (Nuclear Power Engineering Section - Division of Nuclear Power) , Mr Shahid Mallick (Safety and Security Corrdination Section - Office of the Deputy Director General)
      • 2:30 PM
        President's Opening Remarks 20m
        Speaker: Mr Pal Kovacs
      • 2:50 PM
        2010 Conference Outcomes 20m
        Speaker: Mr Ambassador Al Kaabi
      • 3:10 PM
        Report of the Committee for Nuclear Energy Competence in Finland 20m
        Speaker: Mr Jorma Aurela
    • 3:30 PM 4:00 PM
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 4:00 PM 5:45 PM
      Session 1A - Human Resources and Capacity Building Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Convener: Mr Didier LOUVAT (France)
      • 4:00 PM
        IAEA Introduction 10m
        Speaker: Mr Gustavo Caruso (IAEA)
      • 4:10 PM
        Strategic International Cooperation of Fukui Pref. Gov. in Human Resources Development for Nuclear Power Programmes 20m
        The Fukui Prefectural Government has been hosting 13 nuclear power plants and FBR Monju. Fukui International Human Resource Development Center for Atomic Energy was established in April 2011 aiming to support capacity building, in particular human resource development, for emerging countries to introduce the first nuclear power plant. The Fukui Pref. Gov. has signed the Practical Arrangement with IAEA in Oct. 2013 for the cooperation in promotion of nuclear technology for nuclear power and radiation/isotopes applications with emphasis on HRD. The Fukui Pref. Gov. has strategic plans to share its experience hosting nuclear power plants in terms of stakeholder involvement, better communication with communities near nuclear power plants, development of these communities, and improved coordination with the utilities operating nuclear power plants. In addition to 13 NPPs there are training center for nuclear plant operators, radiation monitoring center, off-site center for emergency, Institute of Nuclear Safety System, University of Fukui and Fukui University of Technology which have nuclear engineering faculty in Fukui Pref. These facilities and academic institutes with a variety of experts of nuclear power are highly useful to the international HRD programmes. Since 2011 Fukui International Human Resource Development Center for Atomic Energy has been organizing a number of international training courses in cooperation with the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), and IAEA focusing on the area of nuclear power to support emerging countries. These activities have been highly appreciated by the recipient countries. In view of energy security, mitigation of GHG emission and economic competitiveness, nuclear power continues to be essential energy option for sustainable development, and nuclear HRD is inevitable.
        Speaker: Mr Issei Nishikawa (Governor, Fukui Prefectural Government of Japan)
      • 4:30 PM
        The Nuclear Power Institute Programs for Human Resource Development for the Nuclear Industry 20m
        This paper reports on the programs of the Nuclear Power Institute at Texas A&M University. NPI is a unique partnership of universities, community colleges, industry, high schools and junior highs, teachers and students, government agencies, civic and elected leaders, and communities. NPI’s goal is capacity building and developing the next generation of the nuclear workforce by informing and preparing individuals for careers in the nuclear industry, reaching out to schools, teachers and students, and fostering public acceptance and support for nuclear energy. At the baccalaureate and Master’s levels, NPI offers a distance delivery program providing technical backgrounds in nuclear power plant technology for students in several engineering disciplines. The curriculum has been developed in collaboration with industry. For technicians/technologists, new two-year programs at the community and technical college prepare students for employment at nuclear power plants in the areas of non-licensed operators, electrical technicians, instrumentation and control, and radiation protection. NPI also has very active outreach programs at the high school and junior high levels that utilize nuclear energy as a means to inform and attract students into science and engineering. These outreach programs lead to a greater understanding of the role and benefits of nuclear energy, and an awareness of the career opportunities in nuclear. Finally, NPI reaches out to communities and families through the Science On Saturday (SOS) program that promotes enthusiasm and interest in nuclear technology. The NPI programs represent an integrated “end-to-end” approach that start as young as kindergarten going all the way through graduate studies. Furthermore, utilizing these capabilities, NPI offers training courses and missions to countries with established nuclear programs and nuclear “newcomer” nations. There is much interest internationally to utilize and replicate these activities to support human resource development for the use of nuclear energy.
        Speaker: Mr Kenneth Peddicord (Nuclear Power Institute, Texas A&M University)
      • 4:50 PM
        Challenges to CB for Newcomers and Vision for HRD 20m
        Speaker: Mr Zam Zam Bin Jaafar
      • 5:10 PM
        Building capacity through leadership development programmes in nuclear industry 15m
        The State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” has ambitious business objectives both on the local market and internationally. One of the key challenges that is being faced is related to the managerial skills. New approaches and new systems that have been implemented in nuclear industry in Russia over the last few years require new competencies for all levels of management, from top-managers responsible for traditional and newly created businesses, to line managers responsible for managing small units and working groups. To meet this challenge Rosatom has launched a number of initiatives in human resource development area: • new corporate values and new corporate competencies have been developed and disseminated within the industry, • procedures for assessing key managerial competencies have been designed and integrated into the HR management system; industry-wide asessment centre has been created in Rosatom Corporate Academy • methodologies for identifying talents and potentially successful managers have been developed and put into practice; three levels of hi-po pool have been created; • new modular development programmes for all levels of management and hi-po development programmes have been developed and launched in Rosatom Corporate Academy.
        Speaker: Dr Andrey Afonin (Rosatom Corporate Academy)
    • 9:00 AM 10:30 AM
      Session 1B - Human Resources and Capacity Building Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Ms Jean Llewellyn, Mr Osaisai Erepemo
      • 9:20 AM
        Human Resources Development Challenges for Nuclear Newcomers 20m
        One essential challenge for nuclear newcomers is to develop a national human workforce able to safely and efficiently implement the program and operate the fleet of plants over its life cycle. The scope of the workforce strongly depends on the nuclear strategy and the schedule for its implementation. For the majority of countries, the development of a nuclear energy program is an opportunity to create thousands of jobs for the local workforce. The country must comply with international recommendations and regulations and establish a strong infrastructure with different stakeholders. The extent of the related local work force involved in nuclear regulation, supply chain, operation and research and education activities, will specify the development needs. This lecture will present a general overview of resource needs, and possible paths of development and implementation of national human capabilities for the nuclear program. It will explain why and how the solutions for Human Resources Development (HRD) must account for all types of workforce needed in a nuclear energy program, be it nuclear specialists or not. Available options for development paths will be discussed, and their relations to industrial schemes as well as international cooperation. The presentation will give a broad vision on the involvement of all stakeholders (government, education, research, industry) in HRD and the necessary integration of all initiatives in a global approach aligned with international standards. Finally, the lecture will present resource needs figures for one development path, and illustrate it with an example of a successful cooperation between a historically nuclear country, and a nuclear newcomer. Conclusions will be drawn for a future development strategy that will best contribute to the country’s development objectives, and that effectively deals with the priority issues of excellent nuclear safety culture, enhanced safety requirements, and efficient nuclear power program implementation.
        Speakers: Mr Geisser Robert (AREVA GmbH) , Mr Xavier Perrette (AREVA University)
      • 9:40 AM
        EHRO-N AND THE HUMAN RESOURCES OF THE NUCLEAR ENERGY SECTOR. ANALYSIS OF DEMAND AND SUPPLY IN EUROPE 15m
        In 2010, the European Human Resources Observatory for the Nuclear energy sector (EHRO-N) analysed the demand and supply of human resources (HR) in the European nuclear field in the short, medium and long term. Before this analysis, no comprehensive picture on the demand/supply of nuclear HR was available for the whole EU-27. Apart from France, UK and Finland, who have monitored their national demand and supply of the nuclear workforce through comprehensive national surveys, the availability of national data varies, indeed, from country to country. However, national data and reports on nuclear HR are missing for most EU's Member States (MSs). The same reports produced by international organizations, such as IAEA and OECD/NEA, do not always provide complete data. The paper summarizes the result of the EHRO-N analysis. The focus is on the match (and mismatch) between the demand and supply of highly skilled workforce in the nuclear field (or ''nuclear experts'') at present and in the future. Data was collected by EHRO-N through an EU-wide survey. The process of data collection and analysis also benefited from the co-operation with EHRO-N's Senior Advisory Group (SAG), which brings together the representatives of research organisations, industry, international organisations, etc. involved in nuclear energy across Europe. Finally, the paper puts the demand/supply of nuclear experts in the EU-27 into a broader perspective by highlighting the major lessons learnt and possible future areas of intervention and compares it to a top-down modelling study on HR needs based on the EU 2050 Energy Road map.
        Speaker: Mr Massimo Flore (European Commission - JRC)
      • 9:55 AM
        PROGRESS IN HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT OF OFFICE OF ATOMS FOR PEACE, THAILAND 15m
        Introduction of Thailand’s first nuclear power program (NPP) in Power development plan 2007 has drawn attention of relevant organizations in preparation for the project. The Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) mission was conducted in 2008. One of results from the INIR mission indicated that Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP), as the national regulatory body, needs to develop a comprehensive human resources development plan (HRDP) that covers Milestone I and II of NPP. As a result, the HRDP of OAP has been developed in preparation for Thailand first NPP and a new research reactor. The training need analysis was conducted by Systematic Assessment of Regulatory Competence Needs for Regulatory Bodies of Nuclear Facilities (SARCoN) developed by IAEA, and the KSA list was selected in accordance with current and near-term responsibilities. Results of the analysis is used to develop the training plan of Bureau of nuclear safety regulation of OAP. The methodology will be applied to relevant departments of OAP in the future. In addition, the outreach program is provided by Nuclear and radiation capacity building center of OAP in order to promote public understanding and long-term capacity building. For example, a curriculum covering fundamental of nuclear and radiation and their application has been established for high school students. This paper provides insight into progress in the HRDP development and the long-term capacity building provided by the OAP.
        Speaker: Mr Pantip Ampornrat (Office of Atoms for Peace)
        Slides
      • 10:25 AM
        Q&A 5m
    • 10:30 AM 11:00 AM
      Coffe Break 30m
    • 10:30 AM 11:00 AM
      Interactive 1
    • 11:00 AM 12:30 PM
      Session 1C - Human Resources and Capacity Building Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Mr Aucyone Da Silva (Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria) , Mr Muhamad Bin Lebai Juri (Director General Nuclear Malaysia, Malaysia)
      • 11:05 AM
        Vietnam’s Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power: Status, Perspectives and Challenges 20m
        The Resolution on the Investment Decision for the Ninh Thuan Nuclear Power Project was approved by the National Assembly of Vietnam in November 2009. Various activities have been actively carried out to develop the nuclear power infrastructure for the first nuclear power project, which includes two 2-unit plants (1000 MW per unit). To develop the human resource for the nuclear power program, the Project on Training and Human Resource development in the Field of Atomic Energy was approved on August 2010. In 2012, EVN 's Human Resource Training Project for Nuclear Power Plant in NinhThuan, which focuses on training operator for the NPP, was also approved by the Prime Minister. In 2012, the statistics of and the forecast on nuclear power workforce of Vietnam organizations (management agencies, regulatory body, utility, TSO and universities) up to 2020 was conducted. Vietnam has received the continuing support in human resource development from the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Russian Federation, Japan and some other countries. The oral presentation will provide the audience with an overview on status, perspective and challenges in human resource development for nuclear power in Vietnam.
        Speaker: Mr Anh Tuan HOANG (Director General, Vietnam Atomic Energy Agency, Ministry of Science and Technology)
      • 11:25 AM
        HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT BY THE EASTERN EUROPE RESEARCH REACTOR INITIATIVE (EERRI) 15m
        An increasing number of Member States (MS) request IAEA assistance to develop nuclear skills and resources in support of national nuclear science and technology programmes under development—including programmes related to nuclear power. For countries with little or no existing nuclear infrastructure, human resources and skills must be developed to support planning, analysis, evaluation and other prerequisite activities for the decision making process. The Eastern European Research Reactor Initiative (EERRI) was approached by the IAEA to organize and implement a Group Fellowship Training Program on Research Reactors (GFTPRR) to satisfy the increasing demand for the aforementioned skill development. The GFTPRR has been offered to participants from MS who have expressed interest in this subject to the IAEA. The first training course started in spring 2009 with six participants organised by the institutions listed in the title. Until spring 2014 eight training courses have been carried out while rotating the course among the four involved institution with a total number of about 60 participants from nuclear emerging countries. This paper presents the planning procedures, the course content, the logistics and the experience of such an international nuclear training course, which could be of major interest for other regional training courses world-wide.
        Speaker: Mr Helmuth Boeck (Vienna University of Technology/Atominstitut)
      • 11:40 AM
        T.B.D. 15m
      • 11:55 AM
        Panel Discussion, Q&A 35m
    • 12:30 PM 2:00 PM
      Interactive 2
    • 12:30 PM 2:00 PM
      Lunch 1h 30m
    • 2:00 PM 3:30 PM
      Session 2A - Preparing the Next Generation of Nuclear Professionals Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Ms Jaana Isotalo (Posiva, Finland) , Ms Jane LeClair (National Cybersecurity Institute at Excelsior College)
      • 2:00 PM
        IAEA Presentation 10m
        Speaker: Mr Luis Carlos Longoria (IAEA)
      • 2:10 PM
        Plans for Competency-based Human Resources Management in KINS 20m
        Speaker: Mr Young-Joo Choi
      • 2:30 PM
        From Education to employment-Inspiring and strengthening the pathways to secure nuclear future 15m
        To construct and operate Hinkley Point C, a new nuclear power station in the South West of England, a sizeable workforce will be needed with skills that either do not currently exist or do not exist in the quantities required. Due to the time scales of the build many of that potential workforce are currently in education at schools,colleges,further and higher education. EdF Energy and their construction partners are also committed to recruiting a large percentage of those skills in the communities local to the station where the additional challenges include aspiration, education performance and rural location The growth of UK infrastructure, including future nuclear plant, means a heightened demand for such skills not just locally but nationally. Consequently, a very competitive marketplace could evolve that could be detrimental to progress if not forecast and managed effectively. Inspiring and developing the next generation to support such ambition is critical and it is a real skills challenge to create a large enough pool from which to recruit. To meet these needs the skill base is being developed and the pipelines from education into employment are being strengthened. This paper addresses the challenges and opportunities Edf Energy face with building and operating the first EPR in the UK. These include the skills and education framework that has been put in place to encourage and facilitate a clearer pathway from education to employment, the lessons already learnt and what lies ahead. The paper will include the issues and importance surrounding the take up and performance in STEM subjects (science,technology,engineering and maths) This is fundamental to the future of the industry and how, collaboratively, a start is being made to address the recognised gap in the levels required to the levels needed to deliver the future nuclear power generation programme.
        Speaker: Ms Lynne matthews (EDF Energy)
      • 2:45 PM
        BRIDGE of GENERATIONS. Project of JSC Atomenergomash 15m
        The basic premise of the project idea KLRM «BRIDGE of GENERATIONS» was observed phenomenon of the ageing of the labour collectives of the enterprises of machine-building complex. In particular, we have a high part of workers of retirement and pre-retirement age, which having unique knowledge and experience in the field of design and production technology, and the share of young people is not sufficient. This fact carries the risk of loss of key knowledge on the horizon next 10-15 years. And it’s compounded by a lack of positive practices in Russia retention and transfer of knowledge, as well as low motivation the “possessors of knowledge” for the preparation of his « replacement». The project started in 2010 on 2 key enterprises of the division. Today the project covers 6 division companies: ZiO-Podolsk (Podolsk, Moscow region), GIDROPRESS (Podolsk, Moscow region), SverdNIIkhimmash (Ekaterinburg), TSKBM (Saint- Petersburg), CNIITMASH (Moscow), OKBM AFRIKANTOV (Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the project are first of all connected with increase of efficiency of HR-policy and achievement of strategic goals: - creation of organizational conditions for the retention and transfer of knowledge in enterprises of JSC «Atomenergomash» - retention of critical knowledge and technologies - reducing the average age of the personnel - development of young specialists and raising the level of staff involvement in the group. The essence of the project is to develop the methodology and to implement the organizational approach, directed to the critical knowledge loss risk management, assessment of the risks of loss of critical knowledge, creation of conditions to ensure the succession of knowledge and retention of the best practices in our enterprises
        Speaker: Ms Ksenia Sukhotina (HR Director)
      • 3:15 PM
        Q&A 15m
    • 3:30 PM 4:00 PM
      Interactive 3
    • 3:30 PM 4:00 PM
      coffee break 30m
    • 4:00 PM 5:30 PM
      Session 2B: Preparing the Next Generation of Nuclear Professionals Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Ms Patricia Wieland, Ms Valerie Segovia
      • 4:00 PM
        Slovenske Electrarne Keynote 20m
        Speaker: Mr Jozef Zlatnansky
      • 4:20 PM
        Initiatives of the Belgian SCK•CEN Academy to attract young talent in nuclear research and technology 20m
        Several studies and reports show a concern for future availability of high-level nuclear competences. Moreover, it is often mentioned that there might be a shortage of specialized high-educated personnel in the broad sector where ionising radiations is used (being the nuclear industry, healthcare, research and governmental organisations). Therefore, measures should be taken to support young students in their need to gain and maintain high-level nuclear knowledge and to provide attractive career opportunities. The SCK•CEN Academy contributes to this tasks and supports education for students through (i) supervising young students from Bachelor to PhD level, (ii) contributing to academic courses like the ones of the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network (BNEN), the Radiation Protection Expert course and others, and (iii) familiarizing high school pupils and their teachers with the state of the art of nuclear research and with the daily activities performed at our research centre. Students are given access to our research laboratories to prepare their experimental work. We work closely together with Belgian and international universities, and with end-users such as the industry and the medical sector. This combination provides an exceptional learning opportunity: students stay in close contact with the academic world and at the same time they enjoy a unique international research environment, with advanced nuclear experimental facilities and top-level guidance from our experts. This presentation discusses the latest developments of the SCK•CEN Academy in this field, it highlights collaborations with e.g. universities and industry, and gives an overview of the numbers of participation.
        Speaker: Ms Michèle Coeck (SCK-CEN)
      • 4:40 PM
        Hiring and Retaining the Next Generation of Nuclear Professionals 15m
        A new generation of nuclear professionals is entering the workforce with attitudes, values, and beliefs considerably different than previous generations. Advanced technology, fast paced team activities, instant communication and quick decision making are just a few of Millennials' expectations in the work environment. A “once in a generation” opportunity exists to improve nuclear station performance by welcoming the next generation and encouraging their active engagement. A key requirement is that they retain our strong, intrinsic commitment to nuclear, radiological and personnel safety – areas that may not yet be high on their value list. This challenge may be addressed, in part, by considering the affective domain in the hiring, training, and retaining of new employees. The usual approach when recruiting candidates involves evaluating their work history, past performance, and cognitive ability. However, consideration to the affective domain should also be addressed. Piaget notes, “At no level can we find a behavior or a state which is purely cognitive without affect” (Clark & Fiske, 1982). Examples of essential skills that fit into the affective domain are: respecting diverse opinions and contributions of others; interacting with other teams to achieve corporate goals; and taking responsibility for one’s actions and consequences. These skills are external expression of internalized attitudes, beliefs, and values. The new generation of workers has aspirations beyond extrinsic rewards that motivated past generations. They expect that their contributions will be sought and highly valued –that they are truly making a difference. Application of affective domain concepts addresses these aspirations by matching where organizational needs and the individual’s competence and passion intersect. This paper develops the implications of the affective domain on the hiring and retention of the next generation of nuclear professionals who will contribute to the continued quest for excellence in all aspects of nuclear power.
        Speaker: Mrs Audrey Cate (Institute of Nuclear Power Operations)
      • 4:55 PM
        Panel Discussion, Q&A 35m
    • 9:00 AM 10:30 AM
      Session 3A - Building and Sustaining Capacity through Education and Training Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Mr B.K.B Nyrako, Mr Phil Beeley
      • 9:00 AM
        IAEA Presentation 10m
        Speaker: Mr Jong Kyun Park (IAEA)
      • 9:10 AM
        KAERI Keynote Speaker 20m
        Speaker: Ms Youngmie Nam
      • 9:30 AM
        Overview of NRA Human Resource Development Center and NRA Cooperation and Support for IAEA/ANSN 20m
        Speaker: Mr Shokei Sato
      • 9:50 AM
        Hungarian-Vietnamese Nuclear Energy Train the Trainers Course 15m
        Following an agreement between Hungary and Vietnam, nuclear training of 160 Vietnamese university lecturers was realized in four groups in year 2012 and 2013 in Hungary. The 6 weeks long HUVINETT (“Hungarian-Vietnamese Nuclear Energy Train the Trainers Course”) upgrading courses consisted of two parts: in the first three weeks the participants attended lectures and performed laboratory experiments in the Training Reactor of the Institute of Nuclear Techniques of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME). In the second three weeks they improved their practical skills and knowledge at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, among others in the Maintenance Performance Improvement Center and in the Full Scope Simulator. The efficiency of the training course was demonstrated by the results of the entrance and exit tests written by the participants. The objective of the training program was to help the seven largest universities of the Asian country prepare for the education and training of highly qualified nuclear workforce. According to the decision of the Vietnamese government, Russian companies will build and put into operation two 1200 MW units of pressurized water reactors in Vietnam by 2020. The paper describes the structure of the HUVINETT courses and the experience of the cooperation between the teaching experts of BME, Paks NPP and the Vietnamese universities.
        Speaker: Mr Attila Aszódi (Budapest University of Technology and Economics Institute of Nuclear Techniques)
      • 10:05 AM
        EDF Skills Management for Operations 15m
        In a context where 50% of French NPP’s personnel will get retired within 2015 (e.g. ~1,000 people to recruit each year within a 10-year period) and substantial plant modifications are being made, EDF Nuclear Generation (DPN) decided in 2010 to implement a new competency management model to meet NPPs performance expectations. Being the French adaptation of the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) model, all NPPs have started to apply it. It is composed of a variety of elements regarding standards, facilities, organization and resources that make it easier to generate, capture, validate, transfer and preserve knowledge : - A new frame of reference regarding competency management has been established in Oct. 2011 and contains eight performance objectives. - Training infrastructures and tools are being developped to support local practical training courses. They include mock-ups of valves, pumps, C&I and electrical desks and new simulators. - At each plant, three levels of training committees are established and scheduled every three month alternately to reinforce the role of managers as training programme owners, to identify the needs, to decide whether or not training is a solution to fix a performance gap and to prioritize training activities when chosen. National training committees are also running since 2013. - One training expert is appointed at each of the training centres to give support to managers during training committees. New instructors are locally recruited in technical areas such as mechanics, electricity and C&I. - Transfer of Knowledge methods are used to capture knowledge, skills and attitudes of experts and to transfer them to the new comers. - Task-to-Training matrix (Job-Task-Analysis based) are being developped for technical job by DPN national job leaders.
        Speaker: Mr Christophe POIZAT (EDF)
      • 10:20 AM
        Q&A 10m
    • 10:30 AM 11:00 AM
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 10:30 AM 11:00 AM
      Interactive 4
    • 11:00 AM 12:30 PM
      Session 3B - Building and Sustaining Capacity through Education and Training Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Mr Anwar Habib, Mr Mikhail Strikhanov
      • 11:00 AM
        The WINS Academy Security Certification Programme: The Route to Demonstrable Competence 20m
        Being demonstrably competent or professionally certified to do your job is the norm in nearly all professions, be it medicine, teaching, engineering, project management or a host of other professional endeavours. This process of developing competence through certification is the hallmark of Professionalisation and leads to an identifiable mark of quality that is attached to practitioners. In the nuclear industry, it is highly likely that many of the accountants, engineers and safety professionals belong to chartered institutes that certify their members’ competence on an on-going basis. But the same is not at all common for security professionals and others with senior managerial or regulatory responsibilities relating to security. A number of States have recognised this gap and have begun to support the need for certified professional development. This is reflected in planned statements for the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit that will encourage States to ensure that all personnel with management accountabilities for nuclear security are demonstrably competent. This new focus is of essential importance. Almost all systems, be they for nuclear security or any other field of human endeavour, rely on the effectiveness of human performance. To help the internationally community meet this need for demonstrably competent personnel, WINS has launched the Academy: a programme of certified professional development designed in partnership with the world’s largest professional education provider. The Academy programme is centred on a core Foundation Module that sets out security as a strategic, operational activity to be implemented across the organisation and as a fundamental aspect of risk management and corporate reputation. Implementing such a programme requires the collaboration of a number of key organisational roles and WINS is developing Modules for eight Stakeholders. All of the Modules will be available online and at over 5,000 accredited test centres in 177 countries.
        Speaker: Mr Roger Howsley (World Institute for Nuclear Security)
      • 11:20 AM
        Nuclear Human Capability Building Program in Saudi Arabia 15m
        The paper describes the human capability building (HCB) program that has been designed to enable successful development of the atomic and renewable energy (A&RE) sectors. The paper is focusing in atomic energy sector. Phase-one of the work investigated existing and future trends in demand and supply, concluding with an assessment of the workforce gap and human capability challenges facing the A&RE sectors in Saudi Arabia. Phase-two work provided a considered response to findings from Phase one including detailed individual implementation plans for twelve strategic focus areas. The HCB Roadmap draws on the views, experiences and expectations shared by stakeholders throughout the project and in several major workshops. Nuclear workforce roles, qualifications and competencies including the knowledge, skills and behaviours were identified in design, construction, operations and maintenance phases. New, changing and/or existing roles were identified, forming the basis for understanding where the K.A.CARE working with the local education and training system will need to place the greatest emphasis. A detailed model on the need of the nuclear workforce as a function of timeline and ramp up speed of the programme, number and type of power plants and co-location assumptions was created. The supply of existing workforce and graduates from the local education and training system was modelled in order to identify and analyse the workforce gaps over time. As a result of the modelling work, identification of local and international institutions for nuclear training, best practices, value chains and involvement with the stakeholders, K.A.CARE has a detailed taxonomy database of roles in the A&RE sectors and possibility to create demand and supply models that can project out and analyse workforce gaps out to 2045 and beyond, as well as a stakeholder engagement tool and HCB Roadmap with implementation plans.
        Speaker: Mr Meslet AlHajri (Senior Advisor, Strategy Management Office, King Abdullah City for Atomic & Renewable Energy (K.A.CARE), Kingdom of Saudi Arabia)
      • 11:35 AM
        Human Resource Management in the Belgian TSO Bel V 15m
        Within the Belgian TSO Bel V, an integrated management system (IMS) has been developed and is certified according to ISO 9001:2008. One of the main processes of the IMS is the Human Resource Management (HRM) process. This process is subdivided into three sub-processes: Administrative & Social HRM, HRM & Development by competences and Assessment of the HRM Process. This presentation will summarise the structure and content of all documents and procedures of the HRM process and will describe how the process is implemented. In particular the following sequence of activities will be presented: 1. Definition of all the roles necessary to fulfil the regulatory functions attributed to Bel V, with description of all the tasks and duties assigned to each role and to each staff member, including the qualification requirements. 2. Identification of the individual existing competence (KSA) gaps using the SARCoN tool, on the basis of a reference list of KSAs and the role descriptions. 3. Periodic evaluation of the training needs on the basis of the competence gaps leading to the definition, organisation and evaluation of the training activities by application of the systematic approach to training (SAT). The recruitment process will be described: actually, the analysis of the competence gaps may lead, in addition to training of present staff, either to internal job rotations or to announcement of new positions through the Bel V website if no internal expertise is available. In the frame of the competence gap analysis, the interaction between competence management, knowledge management and a new interpersonal effectiveness development project will be explained.
        Speaker: Ms Marika ROOBAERT (Bel V)
      • 11:50 AM
        Strengthening Technical Specialist Training for an Expanding Nuclear Power Programme in the UK 15m
        Nuclear power plants require a highly-trained, multi-skilled, competent workforce with a range of technical skills, some of which are highly specialist and nuclear-specific. The anticipated expansion of nuclear power in the UK will significantly increase demand for such skills and it is therefore essential that utilities and training providers work together to provide education and training in the most effective and efficient manner. In the UK, the development of technical staff has tended to follow one of two traditional routes. The academic route involves study at university (up to 4 years), usually followed by a work-based graduate development programme (2 years) in which personnel learn to apply their engineering knowledge to real problems within the industry. The vocational route usually involves a work-based engineering apprenticeship (4 years) which includes part-time study for nationally-recognised technical qualifications developed in a particular engineering discipline and therefore not usually nuclear-specific. Neither of these routes is necessarily the most efficient or effective way of developing a sustainable resource of advanced, technical-competent specialists with the blend of knowledge, skills and operational experience, combined with the behavioural traits and safety culture required by the industy. Gen2 has worked closely with our major client and partner, Sellafield Ltd, to develop an alternative education and training programme for young, high-calibre, technically-motivated school-leavers which combines academic and vocational learning to provide an innovative, accelerated route to qualification as an advanced technician in nuclear-related operations. This paper will describe the development and implementation of the Technical Specialist Trainee Scheme (TSTS) for Sellafield Ltd. While currently servicing the training requirements for a major nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, the paper will describe proposals to extend the scope of the programme to nuclear power plant operations.
        Speaker: Mr John Robertson (Gen2 Training)
      • 12:05 PM
        Q&A 25m
    • 12:30 PM 2:00 PM
      Interactive 5
    • 12:30 PM 2:00 PM
      Lunch 1h 30m
    • 2:00 PM 3:30 PM
      Session 3C - Building and Sustaining Capacity through Education and Training Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Takuya Hattori (JAIF, Japan) , Vuong Huu Tan (DG VARANS, Vietnam)
      • 2:00 PM
        Ukraine Keynote Speaker 20m
        Speaker: Ms Natalia Klos
      • 2:20 PM
        Human resource development for the new nuclear build programme in South Africa 20m
        The South African Government has identified the need to install new power generation capacity if it is to maintain the growth of the country. As part of this increase capacity, it has been proposed that 9.6 GW will come from new nuclear power stations to be built at various locations within the country. Like many countries around the world and because there has been no new nuclear power stations constructed, South Africa has seen the decline in the numbers of people who have the necessary nuclear skills to build, commission, operate and finally decommission a nuclear power station. To this end a number of academic institutes have put forward plans to enlarge or even develop from new, various courses and training programmes. To meet this need for such qualified individuals this paper will consider a number of different solutions that have been developed to train and educate students for entry into the nuclear new build programme. Amongst the concepts considered will be Professional Development Courses (PDCs) that have been created under the auspices of a Mentor/Protege programme, jointly created by King's College London and Wits University Johannesburg South Africa, a programme in nuclear technology leadership at a Masters level (Wits University) and an undergraduate programme in nuclear science and engineering also running at Wits. Where appropriate mention will also be made of what other academic and training institutions are doing in South Africa to uplift and develop the nuclear workforce
        Speaker: Mr James Larkin (Radiation and Health Physisc Unit, University of the Witwatersrand)
        Paper
      • 2:40 PM
        Improving education, training and communication with public on ionizing radiation 15m
        In order to improve the education, training and communication processes for informed behaviour and decision-making related to ionizing radiation risk the European Commission has launched special project EAGLE in the framework of FP7-EURATOM. The project aims at coordinating the information and communication strategies related to ionizing radiation for the general public, in order to get a better understanding of the effects of ionising radiation, taking into consideration also the lessons learnt from the 2011 accident in Fukushima (Japan). For this purpose, the EAGLE project will analysis the education, information and communication needs for the general public at EU level on ionizing radiation, identify and exchange good practices in communication with citizens, address the gaps between information sources, media and the general public and provide provision for support based on modern communication tools for the coordination of information and communication strategies for the general public. The project will review national and international data, tools and methods within different organisation who are providing the information on ionizing radiation (like, formal nuclear and responsible institutions, provider of medical services, research and industry), will look at different ways of information transfer and transformation true classical and new media and investigate the reception of information in general public. Several interactions with public will be organised and established. The results from workshops, dialogue groups and pilot actions aiming at generating a better understanding of different perspectives, perceptions and information needs on ionizing radiation will be presented. Consequently, a special Platform on communication related to ionizing radiation will be introduced with the mission to establish a forum for dialogue and exchange of education, training and communication material between all European organizations. The contribution will present the EAGLE research plan, first results and possibilities for participation.
        Speaker: Ms Nadja Zeleznik (Regional Environmental Center for Central and Eastern Europe)
      • 2:55 PM
        Nuclear Training Excellence Project in Slovenské elektrárne, a.s 15m
        The aim of the paper is to present and share experience with design and implementation of Nuclear Training Excellence Project. As a reaction to several WANO Peer Reviews, NSAC and IAEA-OSART missions in the recent years bringing in recommendations for improvement in nuclear training area, Nuclear Training Excellence Project was launched for both SE NPPs (Mochovce and Bohunice) in 2011. As part of the project preparation and design phase, an organizational change aimed at strengthening of nuclear training role in NPPs was approved. Almost 30 new jobs were created and fulfilled with internally hired professionals. Project goals for 2013-2015 are as follows: - Set and implement nuclear training process in accordance with the best nuclear practice - Apply Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) methodology thoroughly. - Change understanding of nuclear training by plant line management so that they consider it as part of core business. - Develop and start implementing new practical training programs based on SAT methodology, and prepare Practical Training Centers in both NPPs for run - Identify and implement improvements in MCR simulator training based on the best nuclear practice The project consists of 4 sub-projects: 1) team focused on thorough implementation of SAT methodology; 2) team focused on development and standardization of practical training; 3) team focused on improvement of MCR simulator training; and 4) team focused on change management – managing people side of change. Main project activities to date: •Localization of SAT methodology and ensuring its IT support •Launching activities of Nuclear Training Committees •Organizing trainings on SAT methodology for NPPs Top Management and nuclear training personnel •The first SAT phase - Analysis almost completed in both NPPS - Maintenance, Safety, Operation •Starting practical training in newly established Mochovce and Bohunice Practical Training Centers
        Speaker: Ms Alena Kvočková (Nuclear Training Specialist)
      • 3:10 PM
        Q&A 20m
    • 3:30 PM 4:00 PM
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 3:30 PM 4:00 PM
      Interactive 6
    • 4:00 PM 5:30 PM
      Session 3D - Building and Sustaining Capacity through Education and Training Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Convener: Ms Carol Berrigan (NEI, USA)
      • 4:00 PM
        The Nuclear Technology Education Consortium: Helping to Build and Maintain Nuclear Capacity Globally 20m
        Universities offering nuclear courses must work closely with industry to provide employable graduates from full-time courses and the flexibility to cater for part-time students returning to universities to enhance their skills. The UK Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC) was established to meet these twin demands and has the capacity to educate students from all over the world. International students have the option of accessing the programme through eLearning and also have the option of attending modules at any of the ten UK partner universities as they are delivered in an accessible one-week format. Twenty modules are currently offered covering reactor technology, decommissioning, waste management, regulation, safety and environmental impact. Experts deliver the modules augmented by industry lectures on real-life examples to support the technical and theoretical content. Due to the modular nature of the programme students can decide on the level of qualification that best meets their needs. A full Master’s in Nuclear Science and Technology option is available as well as a Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate and individual modules can be taken with or without assessment as part of a continual professional development programme. Part-time Master’s students normally complete four modules in each of the first two years with their project in the third year. Accreditation of the programme by the Professional Institutes in the UK is co-ordinated by the Engineering Council. Students from, for example, China, Canada, France, South Africa, Malaysia, United Arab Emirates and Austria as well as the UK have already successfully completed the NTEC programme demonstrating how it is helping to build and maintain nuclear capacity globally. In this presentation I will explain how NTEC operates and how it keeps up to date with industry requirements and maintains its relevance to an ever-evolving global nuclear industry.
        Speaker: Mr John Roberts (The University of Manchester)
      • 4:20 PM
        NUCLEAR BUSINESS ACUMEN TRAINING FOR EXECUTIVES 15m
        Most corporate strategies fail – not primarily because of poor strategy definition but due to deficiencies in strategy implementation. Like in so many human activities, proper training seems to be the way forward. We have developed a methodology for scenario training of nuclear business acumen for executives. This training is based on groups addressing realistic simulated challenges, typical for the executive management team of a nuclear power plant. This training has resulted in improved nuclear business acumen as well as more efficient strategy implementation.
        Speaker: Mr Jan Blomgren (INBEx)
      • 4:35 PM
        Lessons Learned in Performing and Implementing the Results of Training Need Assessment in a Newly Developed Regulatory Body: A Case Study of Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority 15m
        One of the important pre-requisite for a country embarking on or expanding its nuclear programme is careful planning and implementing its manpower development programme. Qualified manpower is essential for the safety and reliability of nuclear power. Pakistan's journey towards development of nuclear safety infrastructure began with the creation of Pakistan Nuclear Safety Committee (PNSC) in 1965, however, an independent regulatory body (PNRA) was established in 2001. A central challenge faced by PNRA after its emergence was to attain and maintain the qualification and competence of its staff member with due consideration to country's expanding nuclear power programme. In order to cope with this challenge, a project was launched in PNRA in 2004 to conduct an organizational review, assess the training needs, determine the existing competency gaps and develop training strategies for PNRA. Organizational review of PNRA was conducted based on the interviews of the senior management and review of documents of PNRA, IAEA and regulatory bodies of other countries. Moreover, the competency need analysis was conducted by applying the four-quadrant competency framework proposed by IAEA for nuclear regulatory bodies. As a result , major strengths as well as several areas of improvement were identified and a number of measures were proposed to fill the gaps. To assess the effectiveness of the measures taken by PNRA, and foster continuous improvement , a similar project was launched in 2011 and significant improvements were observed in area of HRD and in the overall performance of the organization . This paper presents the major challenges faced by PNRA in conducting organizational review, competency need analysis as well as in implementing the measures to fill competency gaps proposed in 2004. In addition, this paper also reveals the strategies and action plan adopted by PNRA to overcome its weakness in the area of HRD.
        Speaker: Mr Moazzam Shahzad (PNRA)
      • 4:50 PM
        New Initiatives for International Cooperation for Nuclear Education in Russia 15m
        The paper describes the main elements of the new ambitions Federal program for leading Russian Universities - the Competitiveness Growth Program among the world's leading research and educational centers for 2013—2020. This Program provides new opportunities for enhancement of nuclear education in Russia and strengthening international cooperation via educational networks. The main aspects of the NRNU MEPhI Program and the action plan to support the Federal Competitiveness Growth Program are under consideration in this paper. National Research Nuclear University "MEPhI" is a strategic partner and the primary university of the SC "Rosatom" providing professionals and scientific-and-innovative support for the nuclear industry, which is aimed to have a multiplier effect on the Russian economy and to strengthen its positions in the world markets. Strengthening University’s competitiveness is the research and education part of the SC “Rosatom” development strategy. Beyond the focus on nuclear industry University aims to actively diversify and expand its positions in areas such as nuclear medicine, radioactive hard electronics, composite materials, cybernetic technologies as well as in technological management and economics. The diversification enables to further strengthen the University as a leading edge multidisciplinary world educational and research centre. The global expansion of SC «Rosatom» (construction and operation of “nuclear sites”, assets and long-term commercial interests in 74 countries) is a natural driver for the radical increase of the share of foreign students and foreign scientists. NRNU MEPhI provides graduates of all categories to support construction of nuclear sites abroad and is positioned as a global center of nuclear knowledge management, considering its close co-operation with the IAEA.
        Speaker: Mr Mikhail N. Strikhanov (Rector, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow, Russian Federation)
      • 5:05 PM
        Panel Discussion, Q&A 25m
    • 9:00 AM 10:30 AM
      Session 4A - Knowledge Management Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Mr David Hoffmann (ANS President, USA) , Mr Raschid Mellouki
      • 9:00 AM
        IAEA Introduction 15m
        Speaker: Mr John de Grosbois (IAEA)
      • 9:15 AM
        NRC Keynote Speaker 20m
        Speaker: Ms Jody Hudson
      • 9:35 AM
        A knowledge transfer program for engineering students at master level at the UPM 15m
        Nuclear technology, developed over more than fifty years, comprises a broad set of branches of knowledge such as mechanical engineering, nuclear physics, automation, etc. During the operational experience of existing reactors it has been developed a vast knowledge that is needed to manage adequately to allow the present and future generations make use of this technology. The IAEA has selected some universities to train teachers for the implementation of a course of nuclear knowledge management in different countries (Albania, Mexico, Russia, Czech Republic, Spain, etc.). Around 20 teachers with different backgrounds received a training course in Karlsruhe (Germany) in December 2011, including a representative of the UPM (Prof. G. Jimenez). Another edition was held in November 2012 for new teachers. This experience has been repeated after. Motivated by the previous initiative, during 2012 and 2013 it was held at the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the UPM's the first editions of "Knowledge Management Seminar in the nuclear sector" which was attended by students of Master of Nuclear Science and Technology and the Master in Power Generation respectively. The scope of those seminars is to create a culture of knowledge management in the new generations entering the field of nuclear engineering. This culture will facilitate the necessary knowledge transfer, which shall be given by the more experienced. This transfer is key to ensuring the highest standards of safety of existing nuclear facilities and for optimizing those reactors whose construction will be in the future
        Speaker: Mr Gonzalo Jimenez (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid)
        Paper
      • 9:50 AM
        Evolution of Knowledge Management: From Expert Systems to Innovation 2.0 15m
        Creation, retrieval, evaluating and using knowledge - summarized as knowledge management – becomes more important in the digitalized world. Hence the evolution of knowledge processing having its root in information technology and artificial intelligence resulting in Web 2.0 and moving towards Innovation 2.0 challenge thorough foundations and raise the question if theoretical framework are capable in dealing with the flexibility of the real world. The University of Vienna studies conceptual modeling as an instrument for knowledge management, resulting in the PROMOTE framework. This paper observes how it is continuously put into practice, by introducing projects in (a) research, (b) industry, (c) national governmental organizations and (d) international organization. In research we can see different waves starting with process-orientation like in PROMOTE, integrating with semantics like in AsIsKnown, moving towards hybrid solutions including workflows, knowledge workers and agents like in eHealthMonitor and moving towards collaborative innovation with game storming. Knowledge management using conceptual models in Industry is often coupled with existing management approaches such as business process management that is extended by information management or Big Data aspects. Projects in national governmental organizations – like the Austrian Defense Academy, or CBRN defense school – demonstrate the potential of conceptual models in form of knowledge scorecards monitoring not only the business process performance, but also the scompetences and necessary resource provision for a safe operation. International organizations - like IAEA – also benefit from conceptual models, as demonstrated with the CA process. Reflecting the observations over the past fifteen years of knowledge management, it can be clearly stated that thorough foundations dealing with the core aspects of knowledge can appropriately be adapted for real world challenges. This paper introduces foundations in conceptual modeling, introduces its application in aforementioned areas and provides an outlook how to approach the upcoming hype of innovation 2.0.
        Speaker: Mr Dimitris Karagiannis (University of Vienna)
      • 10:05 AM
        Q&A 25m
    • 10:30 AM 11:00 AM
      Interactive 7
    • 10:30 AM 11:00 AM
      coffee break 30m
    • 11:00 AM 12:30 PM
      Session 4B - Knowledge Management Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Mr Alexey Dub (ROSATOM) , Mr Randy Edington (EVP Palo Verde NGS, USA)
      • 11:00 AM
        HACETTEPE Keynote Speaker 20m
        Speaker: Ms Sebnem Udum
      • 11:20 AM
        How knowledge mapping is being used to integrate plans for safe and reliable operations 20m
        For any nuclear program locally or nationally, understanding what knowledge is essential for long-term operations and project delivery enables operators and governments alike to plan for success and manage the risks that could affect a successful outcome. When prioritizing and planning for scarce knowledge resources it is essential that first we identify what we need to know and when we need to know it. Often different agencies and departments take different approaches to describing their future knowledge needs, ranging from the types of educational qualifications required through to the numbers of experienced personnel in each professional discipline that need to be hired and technology development roadmaps. This approach makes it more difficult to represent all of these highly-related and interdependent requirements in one integrated plan. Knowledge mapping is a systematic and rigorous analysis tool for identifying the knowledge, competencies, qualifications, skills, information, data, technologies and other knowledge-related resources, when and where the resources will be required and the associated risks. At Sellafield in the UK we rigorously employ a systematic knowledge mapping tool to develop a long-term knowledge management plan. This tool can be used to generate a range of structured and interrelated knowledge-based resource management plans ranging from national nuclear manpower planning to record retention schedules. There are now opportunities to ensure consistency in the activities and plans of different departments and agencies, by collaborating on a unified and comprehensive map of knowledge resources. Ultimately this can be extended into a single plan to facilitate a national program of education, training, recruitment, development, research and development and knowledge application through analyzing the underlying knowledge needs. This holistic approach will ensure that we always have the right people with the right knowledge, skills and information in the right place at the right time.
        Speakers: Ms Helen Mullinder (Sellafield ltd) , Mr John Day (Sellafield Ltd)
      • 11:40 AM
        NUCLEAR KNOWLEDGE LOSS RISK MANAGEMENT (lessons learned, implementation experiences) 15m
        The paper seeks to develop a model for risk management of nuclear knowledge loss in a process-based organization in the Czech Republic. The study uses a project lessons learned approach. In the first stage, existing practices are examined to develop both the model for risk management of knowledge loss and the knowledge loss risk assessment. In the second stage, the KM model is evaluated by testing it in a real life of our two power plants (Temelín and Dukovany). The methods integrated as the foundations of the integrated KM and risk management model are based on the latest innovation management solutions, with strong focus on knowledge and risk management in energy and utilities and ČEZ risk assessment framework. The analytical approach includes a six-dimension integrated model that manages all critical success factors of knowledge management risk management. The results show that, after 7 years of implementing the model became a part of working life in our plants. The integrated KM and risk management model can be used to assist the planning, establishment and evaluation of knowledge loss in projects and operations. This helps to ensure that key issues regarding knowledge loss are covered during the planning and implementation phases. The study provides an integrated perspective of KM in process-based organization. It offers valuable guidelines that can help decision makers consider key issues during a risk assessment of knowledge factors in project management. Outputs of this model can prepare an extensive assessment report about the risk of knowledge loss in a nuclear business.
        Speakers: Mr Jaroslov Vlcek, Ms Romana Květoňová (ČEZ, a.s., Czech Republic)
      • 11:55 AM
        Approaches to maintaining and building organisational knowledge in a nuclear expert organisation 15m
        The context of the presentation is an in-house nuclear design and R&D organisation whose role is to support safe and economical operation of Fortum's NPPs and to identify, maintain and develop the required knowledge. The employees are nuclear experts with engineering/science background. Managing knowledge embedded in the expert work, working culture and collaboration across the expertise areas has been found critical for the organisation. The current KM challenges are mainly related to human resources. The turnover rate of young experts is high and considerable effort needs to be put in job induction. At the same time, due to the low number of recruitments after the Chernobyl accident, there are generation gaps in the experienced workforce. Thus knowledge is being transferred from a small experienced group to a large group with considerably less experience and high turnover rate. Consequently, strategies for maintaining knowledge and organisational learning need to be revised. The increased attrition risk of young experts is believed to be caused by a change in the learning curve after the intense job induction phase. To maintain continuous learning the new expert needs support from the organisation e.g. in building their professional networks and finding more possibilities for developing their expertise. During the recent years, there has been more possibilities for full and small scale job rotation and the opportunity has been most popular among young experts. It is typically believed that developing a nuclear expert takes at least 5 years. Because of the lack of experienced workforce, the new experts are, however, relatively quickly given responsibility of challenging tasks. When the working culture supports teamwork, also learning and knowledge transfer are enhanced. Thus new experts are able to perform well in demanding positions. This also provides them with more challenges and variation in tasks.
        Speaker: Ms Tellervo Tuulikki Juurmaa (Fortum Power and Heat Oy)
      • 12:10 PM
        Q&A 20m
    • 12:30 PM 2:00 PM
      Interactive 8
    • 12:30 PM 2:00 PM
      Lunch 1h 30m
    • 2:00 PM 4:00 PM
      Session 4C - Knowledge Management Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Ms Marta Ziakova (Head of RB, Slovakia) , Ms Natalia Shumkova (DDG NAEK ENERGOATOM, Ukraine)
      • 2:00 PM
        The Strategy of Knowledge Management for Human Resource Development 20m
        Knowledge management has fairly rapidly moved from the category of purely academic concepts to the organizational routines in corporate and government practices. It happened just in the last couple of decades, that the world’s largest companies, consulting organizations, business schools, government agencies and international organizations started to pay increased attention to the topic. There are three reasons for that. First, the development of information technologies, resulted in wide range of new tools for knowledge management. Second, the increased role of expert community and public in making business decisions. Third - is the rising cost of non-material (in fact, knowledge) component in the business processes. One of the main problems is the people who are knowledge creators and knowledge bearers, thus establishing the competent human resources is the most important part of Knowledge Management. The alienation of knowledge from its founder and bearer is a subtle, complex and not always successful process. In Russia, and in ROSATOM in particular, bearers of critical knowledge in the field of nuclear science and technology, as a rule, are people with the old tradition background without understanding the market-based approach to knowledge management. At the same time they are the real knowledge bearers - the knowledge, they possess, simply do not exist in any other, alienated, codified form that assumes its smooth transfer. Historically predefined generational gap in science and engineering schools is a barrier for the conversion of the richest knowledge accumulated during the Soviet era into commodity and further into market capitalization. Working with the bearers of critical knowledge is one of the main components of the effective knowledge management system, which is an attempt to create a system of formalization (if possible), transformation and transfer of this knowledge to the next generation.
        Speaker: Mr Vyacheslav Pershukov (ROSATOM)
        Paper
      • 2:20 PM
        Human Resource Development Activities in Japan and Contribution to the Global Standards 20m
        Japan Nuclear Human Resource Development Network (JN-HRD.net) was established in 2010 as a unique framework for HRD throughout Japan. It has five panels including one for HRD for new comer countries. Even though the Fukushima nuclear accident happened, the nuclear HRD is still/hence considered to be more important than ever for safe operation and decommissioning and for transfer of knowledge, including lessons learned from the accident. We are collecting all the HRD-related activities in the country, especially ones for new comer countries, and making data base and a web site. They are open to the world and designed to be user friendly. We are intensively discussing a comprehensive HRD roadmap for the future using the information there. JN-HRD.net and my university annually organize IAEA Nuclear Energy Management School since 2012. The alumni association has been formed in Japan so that the participants can keep communication. My university is developing practical educational contents; the nineteen textbooks, e-learning materials on fifteen subjects, and DVD textbooks on two subjects. These e-learning contents will be carried on the IAEA’s CLP4NET. We also aim to contribute them to IAEA Virtual Nuclear Management University. Our e-leaning contents can contribute to educating those who don’t have nuclear knowledge. Some of university curricula are closely connected to national and international licenses. We are surveying the licenses all over the world to make our curricula to meet the requirement of the license. Experiments and on-site trainings at facilities having nuclear materials and radiation sources are inevitable. Those facilities must be properly upgraded based on innovative R&D. For this purpose, global cooperation should be promoted in the nuclear society in the world.
        Speaker: Mr Mitsuru Uesaka (University of Tokyo, Nuclear Professional School)
      • 2:40 PM
        Knowledge Management Strategy Adopted by PNRA: A Case Study 15m
        Nuclear power operators and regulatory bodies are facing problems related to shortage of technical and experienced human resource, due to the lack of interest of youngsters in the fields of nuclear science and engineering; and ageing of the existing, experienced manpower. This poses a serious concern for the nuclear industry vis-à-vis its survival and progress. Therefore it is essential for the organizations working in this area, to devise a strategy for the proper management and preservation of knowledge and the intellectual capital. Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority has devised a comprehensive strategy for tackling the issue mentioned hereinbefore. Extensive discussion sessions with knowledge experts for the identification of knowledge domains important for PNRA; assessment of their criticality and maturity using the two assessment models, one developed by Mr. Jean Louis Ermine and the other by International Atomic Energy Agency; and the development of a proper Knowledge Management System are the important planks of PNRA’s knowledge management strategy. Moreover, brain storming sessions with knowledge experts have also enabled us to identify the practices, important for Knowledge Management. As a result of these sessions, PNRA has started a number of activities, in order to support its KM strategy for the preservation and reuse of knowledge for future usage. These include Talent Programs, Job Profiles, Work Force Planning, Succession Planning, Portals and Simulation Tools. Moreover, PNRA is currently developing its own Knowledge Management Portal, based on international standards, state of the art IT tools and professional expertise. This paper provides the strategy adopted by PNRA for the implementation of a Knowledge Management System. It would enable us to identify, preserve and make reusable the knowledge important for a nuclear regulatory body. Effort has also been made to analyze the efficacy of each measure adopted in the overall strategy.
        Speaker: Mr Zaheer Baig (Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority)
      • 2:55 PM
        Knowledge Management Integration into Strategic Human Capital Management Systems 15m
        Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station has developed and successfully integrated a knowledge management approach into their strategic human capital management systems. This approach integrates knowledge management strategies into organizational assessments/business planning, workforce analytics, talent selection and development, and organizational key performance indicators. The presentation will provide the attendees with a practical approach to understanding how Palo Verde implemented the elements of an integrated human capital approach to managing knowledge, skills and the competencies to safely operate a nuclear power plant. The management of this process is accomplished through the utilization of a “People Health Committee” governance and oversight process. The higher level strategy has also been incorporated in to the Palo Verde Leadership Model for long-term sustainability. This approach has yielded several “Strengths” from the Institution of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). The development of these processes are linked to the various supporting IAEA documents: 1. MANAGING HUMAN RESOURCES IN THE FIELD OF NUCLEAR ENERGY IAEA NUCLEAR ENERGY SERIES NO. NG-G-2.1 2. RECRUITMENT, QUALIFICATION AND TRAINING OF PERSONNEL FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS SAFETY STANDARDS SERIES NO. NS-G-2.8 3. WORKFORCE PLANNING FOR NEW NUCLEAR POWER PROGRAMMES, NUCLEAR ENERGY SERIES, NO. NG-T-6.2 4. THE NUCLEAR POWER INDUSTRY’S AGEING WORKFORCE: TRANSFER OF KNOWLEDGE TO THE NEXT GENERATION, IAEA TECDOC 1399 5. KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FOR NUCLEAR INDUSTRY OPERATING ORGANIZATIONS, IAEA TECDOC 1510 6. RISK MANAGEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE LOSS IN NUCLEAR INDUSTRY ORGANIZATIONS, STI/PUB/1248
        Speakers: Mr David Heler (Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station) , Mr Tony Marco (Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station)
      • 3:10 PM
        Q&A 20m
    • 3:30 PM 4:00 PM
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 3:30 PM 4:00 PM
      Interactive 9
    • 4:00 PM 5:30 PM
      Session 5A - Knowledge Networks: Session 5A Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Mr Juan Eibenschutz (Chairperson of Foro) , Mr Khoirul Huda (Chairperson ANSN)
      • 4:00 PM
        IAEA Presentation 15m
        Speaker: Mr Khammar Mrabit (IAEA)
      • 4:15 PM
        ETSON Keynote Speaker 20m
      • 4:35 PM
        Contribution of IAEA, FNRBA and ANNuR as Networking in Developing and Maintaining Capacity Building for a nuclear power programme: comparative study 15m
        Capacity is defined as; ―the ability of individuals and organizations or organizational units to perform functions effectively, efficiently and sustainably. Capacity building is an evidence-driven process of strengthening the abilities of individuals, organizations, and systems to perform core functions sustainably, and to continue to improve and develop over time. This paper will explain the contributions of knowledge networks at the national, regional and international level in developing and sustainable existing capacity building and human resources for regulatory body and other institutions in Sudan to confront the future challenges regarding to nuclear power program- safety and security. FNRBA and ANNuR are two regional networks that form part of the Global Nuclear Safety and Security Network (GNSSN). The GNSSN provides open access to general information on nuclear safety and nuclear security through a common, collaborative platform designed so that experts can exchange and share information easily and quickly In this paper will compare the advantages and effectiveness of these knowledge networks (IAEA(GNSSN), FNRBA, ANNuR ) in capacity building and will explain their major role in enhance the infrastructure of national regulatory body and to enabled the RB in Africa and Arab countries, to establish and strengthen the regulatory infrastructure for nuclear power programme Consistent with international standards and recommendations as well as the recommendations resulting and deduced from comparative study to promote the exchange of knowledge, experience and information among its members.
        Speaker: Mr Omer Elsiddig Osman (Sudanese Nuclear& Radiological Regulatory Authority)
      • 4:50 PM
        AFRA-NEST: A tool for Human Resource Development 15m
        Investigation carried out in Ghana in 2003 revealed that Nuclear Scientists were dwindling in numbers. This threatened and endangered the Human Resource base of Nuclear Scientists. It also seemed to be the trend in Africa as a region and the whole world. With this awareness, it became necessary that measures should be taken to reverse this situation. In Ghana, the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission in collaboration with the University of Ghana, and in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, (IAEA), established the Graduate School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences (SNAS) which has become a Regional Designated Centre, to improve the Human Resource base of Nuclear Scientists in Ghana and Africa. The Africa Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) also established the African Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA-NEST) in order to implement AFRA strategy on Human Resource Development (HRD) and Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM). The establishment of AFRA-NEST, and the recent installation of its e-learning platform (CLP4NET) with the assistance of the NKM Unit of the IAEA which went on-line on about October 25, 2013 with the URL; http://lms.afra-nest.org is a further step to enhance the Human Resouce Development. Essentially, the main function of the AFRA-NEST is to foster sustainable human resource development and nuclear knowledge management to satisfy the needs of African countries with/without higher education in the priority areas of non-power and power applications of nuclear energy. In this regard, Ghana was nominated to host the Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training for the AFRA region. This presentation gives the status of the project so far.
        Speaker: Mr Edison Amanor (Ghana Atomic Energy Commission)
        Slides
      • 5:05 PM
        European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN). Ten years of experience 15m
        The European Nuclear Education Network, whose mission is the preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear fields by higher education and training, has recently celebrated its 10th birthday (September 22, 2013). During the last decade the Association was established as a spin-off of a European Project, took off and gained momentum, acquiring a huge number of member Institutions (64 presently). Several European projects were run in this period under the coordination of the Association or with its active cooperation, leading to tangible results in terms of mutual recognition of curricula, of the establishment of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certification, of organising PhD Events and of contacts among Member Institutions, thus favouring student and teacher exchanges. Part of this effort was spent in order to address non-European Countries, aiming at enlarging the cooperation already established at the European level with several MoUs and practical agreements. In particular, in these years ENEN actively participated in several Euratom Fission Training Schemes (EFTS) and coordinated contributions coming from its Members to better achieve mutual recognition and harmonisation of their high level studies. The initial focus on Nuclear Engineering broadened to include also the fields of waste management and radiation protection, providing full scope educational opportunities in the nuclear sector and making use of the European Credit Transfer system (ECTS) to promote curricula establishment and recognition. Training was also added to the classical educational core business of academic institutions, involving industry and training centres in the development of curricula for specific target groups of engineers. The initiatives of the Members during these years also involved the use of instruments developed to favour borderless mobility and high level education and training, including the Erasmus scheme and KIC-InnoEnergy. Currently is running the NUSHARE project.
        Speaker: Mr Walter Ambrosini
        Slides
      • 5:20 PM
        Q&A 10m
    • 9:00 AM 10:30 AM
      Session 5B - Knowledge Networks Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Conveners: Mr Edward Akaho (AFRANEST) , Mr Hafedh Belmabrouk (Chairperson ANNUR)
      • 9:00 AM
        ANS Keynote Speaker 20m
        Speaker: Mr Donald Hoffman (ANS)
      • 9:20 AM
        National Nuclear Regulatory Portal (NNRP) – a useful regulatory knowledge network 15m
        The National Nuclear Regulatory Portal (NNRP) is a part (sub-site) of the Global Nuclear Safety and Security Network (GNSSN) and contains relevant information on the national regulatory authorities in Member States (MS). NNRP is a set of existing networks and information sources (open or password protected) and serves as a common access point and provides access to scientific, technical and regulatory resources (including databases, websites, applications, publications, safety standards ect.). The NNRP is based on an uniform structure and administered by the respective country itself. At present the content and structure developed in pilot phase is adequate and comprehensive enough. The NNRP contains the Country Nuclear Regulatory Profile (CNRP) as well as further country specific information on items of interest for nuclear regulatory purposes. As a rule, the main architecture of the CNRP contains the following issues: 1) Radiation and nuclear facilities and activities of the country; 2) Responsibilities and functions of the government; 3) Global safety regime; 4) Responsibilities and functions of the regulatory body. In this paper the main objectives and concept of NNRP will be presented. Potential users of NNPR as well as the benefits for MS likes: 1) Making national information resources visible and available via web; 2) Serving as a platform for more effective international cooperation between MS and as a platform for national information and cooperation; 3) Providing easy access to all relevant nuclear regulatory information and sources available on the web (incl. access to all IAEA sources); 4) Increasing transparency; 5) Demonstrating national achievements and current status of nuclear safety infrastructure will be discussed. Bulgarian experience with NNPR will be also described. At the end some suggestion for future improvements of NNPR will be given.
        Speaker: Ms Albena Georgieva (Bulgarian Nuclear Regulatory Agency)
      • 9:35 AM
        NUCLEAR EDUCATION, TRAINING AND OUTREACH IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN REGION 15m
        In December 2010, at a technical meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held in Lima, Peru, the Latin-American Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (LANENT) was formally created. Diversity and contrast are key characteristics of the Latin-American and Caribbean region. For instance, while some countries have very active nuclear programs, including the existence, construction and planning of Nuclear Power Plants and Research Reactors, the use of nuclear technology is below optimum in others. Similar disparities are also observed in nuclear education, training and outreach (NETO) activities, where some countries have ample experience and tradition, with adequate or even exceptional facilities, while others lack them completely. Since its creation, LANENT is actively pursuing joint activities for networking educational institutions at a regional level, the creation of distance learning initiatives and the use of shared facilities are basic cornerstones for the efficient cooperation. Its endeavors are being eased by the recent emergence of e-learning, while providing a way to overcome the vastness of the region. The absence of cultural or idiomatic barriers is an important asset of the region, which certainly facilitates LANENT activities. So are some pre-existing proactive networking initiatives, the open access to high quality equipment for nuclear education, the availability of well trained and highly specialized teachers and programs tailored to the needs of each country throughout the region, and the will to support NETO activities for the common development. Furthermore, most of the areas of Nuclear Education are covered by different countries in the region, even though some few vacancies in specific areas could be detected. All these issues, with emphasis on the status and trends of NETO activities and its key actors in the region, will be analyzed in the present communication.
        Speaker: Mr Raul Barrachina (National Atomic Energy Commission, Argentina)
      • 9:50 AM
        Panel Discussion, Q&A 40m
    • 10:30 AM 11:00 AM
      Coffee Break 30m
    • 11:00 AM 12:30 PM
      Plenary Session Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna

      Convener: Mr Pal Kovacs
      • 11:00 AM
        Panel Discussion 1h 10m
      • 12:10 PM
        President's Summary 20m
    • 12:30 PM 2:00 PM
      Lunch 1h 30m
    • 2:00 PM 3:30 PM
      Closing Board Room C

      Board Room C

      IAEA, Vienna