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USDOE NEAMS Program and SHARP Multi-Physics ToolKit for High-Fidelity SFR Core Design and Analysis

Jun 27, 2017, 11:20 AM
20m
Room 2 (Yekaterinburg)

Room 2

Yekaterinburg

ORAL Track 6. Test Reactors, Experiments and Modeling and Simulations 6.10 Other issues of code development and application

Speaker

Mr Tanju Sofu (Argonne National Laboratory)

Description

Under the Reactors Product Line of U.S. DOE’s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, 3-D, high-fidelity multi-physics simulation capabilities are being developed to address the needs of designers and analysts in studying advanced, non-water reactor systems in general, and SFRs in particular. Simulation-based High-fidelity Advanced Reactor Prototyping (SHARP) toolkit is a suite developed under the Reactors Product Line of NEAMS, and it consists of pin-by-pin neutronics, thermal hydraulic, and structural mechanics modules, as well as the capabilities to integrate these modules for multi-physics analyses. Physics modules currently include the PROTEUS neutronics code, the Nek5000 computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for thermal-hydraulics, and the DIABLO implicit finite element analysis code for structural mechanics. Each module can be utilized as a standalone code component or as part of an integrated analysis. The development philosophy for the modules is to incorporate as much fundamental physics as possible in order to extend functionality to general reactor types, rather than developing tools for a limited set of specific reactor analysis applications. This paper summarizes the initial efforts focusing on SFR design and analysis in demonstration of the inherent and passive safety characteristics resulting from multi-physics thermal-structural-neutronics phenomena.

Country/Int. Organization

U.S.A./Argonne National Laboratory

Primary author

Mr Tanju Sofu (Argonne National Laboratory)

Co-author

Mr Justin Thomas (Argonne National Laboratory)

Presentation materials